Our Bookshelf

These are a few of the books that we are either currently reading or that we pull off our bookshelf again and again. While each book is linked to Amazon, we suggest you first check with your local, independent bookstore, as most if not all of these titles should be available for order.

Check back often to see new listings, and be sure to recommend your classics to us.

 


An important book. Not a deep one, but relevant and to the point. The new paradigm is vastly different from the one we are leaving which complicates the complexities for the world right now. 

 

 

This book is precious. Mostly it is about Elephants and how they communicate but Safina opens new doors to our questions about how animals think and communicate.  This book is poetry and science, curiosity and wonder working together. For anyone exploring communication and language this is a must read book.  Parts of the book can be shared with children.



Humanity in a Creative Universe
By Stuart A. Kauffman

Kauffman's latest book is a world -- maybe universe -- transformer.  He lays out a thesis that if proven (which it will be to the degree that there is proof) changes our entire concept of reality now based on Newtonian physics and reductionism.  Quantum theory, complexity and other emerging sciences open up a far more creative, open world of thought and adjacent possibles. It is only from within this framework, that humanity begins to understand how to end war and poverty.


Kelly is a most credible futurist.  Over and over again, he signals what is coming years early and he shapes how he thinks about it and how the reader might make his observations useful.  While I think his forces are inevitable within our near term future, what we do with them is not inevitable.  We can choose to help develop these tools for a better world, or default letting others choose their course. A must for all those shaping a better world.


Drawn Together through Visual Practice
CDN$ 40.08
By Sam Bradd

Graphic facilitation is a powerful way for a group to come to know themselves and the work they want to do together. It is no wonder that it became a part of any good meeting, conference, or problem solving session!  Solutions come when diversity plays together and being able to see from various vantage points helps a group see what it is they have in common and how to communicate their differences.


“The way we see affects what we do,” writes Nora Bateson near the start of this exploratory, far-ranging foray into “unauthorized knowledge.” In a series of premise-investigations undertaken by way of essays, conference talks, autobiographical story, quotes and poems, ranging through linguistics, biology, semantics, cognitive theory, justice awareness and embrace of paradox, Bateson invites and advocates suppleness of perception, rigor of mind, and depth of feeling.”

As written by Jane Hirshfield, Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.


Resilience: Why Things Bounce Back
CDN$ 26.88
By Andrew Zolli, Ann Marie Healy

This is a complimentary book to any you might be reading on complexity and systems work.  This is an important and interesting read.  The authors compare natural and human systems discovering some important insights into how we can modify our human understanding of growth and resilience to cause less destruction and heartache in our world.  The authors also speak about Translational Leadership. I like this!  I think it is our work to translate the changes born of a new paradigm. 


Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think
By Peter H. Diamandis, Steven Kotler

Abundance provides proof that the proper combination of technology, people and capital can meet any grand challenge" Sir Richard Branson.  This book pulls together so many things that are often invisible to a crumbling paradigm.  An emerging paradigm is surely coming about. 


This is not a great book, but it is fun! I found it valuable because it took me back to the formation of The Learning Exchange, and later when I met Matt and created MG Taylor Corporation.  Good ideas are born out of chaos and change. The 70's were that! Ideas were forming and mixing. Hierarchies were breaking down and various disciplines were finding each other and struggling to find ideas in common.  One paradigm was closing, another opening.  It was a fecund time of exploration and renewal.  I did not know many of the characters in the book, but I knew about them. They were part of the conversations Matt and I had with many others.


I am only a few chapters into this book and have already gained insight and renewed courage to speak up about the educational process we should be birthing and giving life to, rather than using energy to fight to keep the same system (even for good teachers) in place. 

A good companion book is Reality is Broken, by Jane McGonigal.